Monday, November 30, 2009

For the bookworm in you...

The season of gift-giving (and receiving) is soon upon us, so I thought I would do my bit to contribute to some of the suggestions that are floating around out there with regards to great-gift-ideas! I am a certified bookworm (and proud of it I may add) so my gift inspirations are of the linguistic kind (well written anyway). Plus in Canada (The Great White North), where we get winter for roughly 9 months of the year-there really is nothing lovelier than to curl up somewhere warm with a cup of tea (or glass of wine...or shot of vodka...whatever!) and lose yourself in another place. Therefore, I thought it would be appropriate to put together a tini-tiny compilation of some of my favourites...enjoy and happy giving!
For the Fashionista in you...
One of my absolutely favourite blogs-now a book! This fabulous book contains some of the most inspiring, real and raw street style photographs. Kinda makes you feel like a voyeur but in a good way!
Contains some of the most iconic images in fashion-this of this as a pocket-sized fashion encyclopaedia complete with captions that describe where, who and by who the photographs were taken.
"In Vogue" need I say more?
Everyone who is familiar with fashion and styling knows (or should know) Rachel Zoe-stylist to the stars. Pretty decent book for inspiration...
This is little gem contains everything you need to know in order to work in fashion. (even features an interview with Anna Wintour!) Plus I am happy to announce that a fellow MA graduate is featured on page 92-You rock Truc!
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For the (fashion) academic in you...
Critical look at fashion as an industry as well as a phenomenon-interesting take on what fashion means and some of the myth and ambiguity which surrounds it.
A comprehensive look on fashion from different perspectives and angles-I love both these books because they cover almost all facets of the field.
An absolute MUST for anyone interested in fashion theory or history. This book is absolutely beautifully written and extremely comprehensive. It was recommend to me by my thesis supervisor and I am exceptionally grateful because it has helped to solidify my desire to do this topic...
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For the "Sex and the City" lover in you...
A little bit outdated-I admit- but if you are anything like me then you still harbour a love affair with this show. I still watch all of my DVD's as well as the movie religiously and both Carrie's wardrobe, style and apartment are a constant inspiration to me. That being said the book above is an amazing (pictorial) guide to the show-a must for any fan!
An interesting and academic look at the show...I recommend...
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For the interior designer in you...
I'm pretty sure that I cried a little (a lot) when Domino magazine folded, but thank goodness they leave behind something for those in design-mourning. This book is a FANTASTIC and truly inspiring guide to all things interior-I highly HIGHLY recommend...
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Just for fun...
Now time for the truth. We don't have a TV at home (this is not a joke). We made the (difficult) decision early on before coming back from Korea that we would not get a TV for the sole reason that we can do plenty of other things with our time than be distracted by shows. Well, as a result of the lack of menial distraction I developed quite the addiction for cheesy romance novels (don't judge). The one above is actually one of my favourites, so if you love Paris, Romance and girly-goodness this book is definitely for you. I honestly could not put it down...after this, however, we shall never speak of this again :-)
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Just Because...
I couldn't decide what heading to put this under, but I really wanted to recommend it because it is one of my all time favourite books. Barthes writes so beautifully about photography and his impressions of it (from it), I could not leave it out. In one word: beautiful...
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Love K

Lilly Allen for Chanel...

Since I seem to be on a Chanel kick as of late, so to keep with the theme, I thought I would post one of my favourite recent campaigns with Lilly Allen for Chanel. I know it's not super new or anything, but I love it nonetheless and wanted to share some amazing images (both from the shoot and a behind the scenes look) with all of you who love a pretty girl in pretty clothes. Enjoy...
Love K
*picture #1: http://lachanelphile.com/2009/09/24/coco-cocoon-collection-website-launch/
remainder of pictures: http://smooieee.blogspot.com/2009/08/chanel-lily-allen.html
www.chanel.com

Friday, November 27, 2009

I heart CHANEL...

I've been so busy with school and other stuff that I completely forgot to post some of the amazing images from the Chanel 2009 collection,which I absolutely LOVE (but alas cannot afford...le sigh :-) But at least I can admire and dream and most importantly be inspired...enjoy, I know I did...

Love K

Thursday, November 26, 2009

20 Years after the Velvet Revolution...what we wore and where are we now?

As some of you know I started my PhD in Communication at Carleton University this September. So far it's been a heck of a ride. I am still trying to solidify what exactly I will focus my research on but have a pretty good idea that it will look at the development of my motherland (Slovakia) most likely from the lens of visual and material culture; more specifically commodities such as fashion. A lot of academics, and people alike, feel that fashion is simply too frivolous and superficial of a thing to study, however I strongly disagree. Think about the fact that we adorn ourselves every single day in order to represent something about ourselves, more importantly even, when thinking about the economics of the industry (it's a world-wide multi-billion dollar industry) signifies that fashion cannot and should not be viewed lightly. It's a force to be reckoned with! Semiotician, Umberto Eco (2007) claims that we " speak through our clothes" (144). Therefore by examining the particular history where fashion is used and for what means can tell us a lot about the ideological, political, economic and cultural landscape of a particular time and space. This is because a 'fashion history' is a history of culture-objects are extensions of the self (this is why we can re-create entire civilizations through the collection of objects alone!). It (fashion) can tell a story-it can communicate so much through silence! Moreover, clothes communicate not only the past and present but can also hint at the possible future-after all fashion seasons are usually at least a year ahead of actual time.
As Elizabeth Wilson (2003) claims “in all societies, the body is “dressed” and everywhere dress and adornment play symbolic, communicative and aesthetic roles” (3). Therefore fashion can be viewed as a cultural phenomenon, “an aesthetic medium for the expression of ideas, desires and beliefs circulating in society” (9). Lastly, “fashion is the most accessible and one of the most flexible means by which we express ambiguities (of capitalism, the body and the self)-Fashion is modernist irony” (15).
This is particularly why I find a study of the development of Eastern Europe through fashion so fascinating. Especially when one considers the fact that this part of the world was virtually isolated from the rest for over 4 decades. During which people craved 'superficial' things such as clothes, accessories and other commodities, that for the most part were completely unattainable. To get to my point, recently, as in yesterday, I put together a presentation for one of my classes summarizing some of my ideas pertaining to this theme. I thought it would be nice to share my slides to commemorate 20 years after the fall of the Iron Curtain-and to convince some of you skeptics out there, that fashion isn't as frivolous as some claim...(plus a bit of vanity here: I really worked hard on these slides and figured it would be a shame to save them in my personal archives never to be looked at again...) Enjoy!

Love K

Sources used:
Eco, U. "Social Life as Sign System" in Barnard, M. (ed.,) Fashion Theory, A Reader. Routledge: New York, 2007: 143-147.
Wilson, E. Adorned in Dreams: Fashion and Modernity. Rutgers University Press: New Jersey, 2003.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

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